Contents tagged with Windows Server 2003

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 to Phase Out Itanium

    Posted by bink on April 5 2010, 10:49 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2008 R2.

    Windows Server 2008 R2 will be the last version of Windows Server to support the Intel Itanium architecture.  SQL Server 2008 R2 and Visual Studio 2010 are also the last versions to support Itanium. 

    Current support for Itanium remains unchanged.  Each of these products represent the state of the art of their respective product lines.  Each fully support Itanium, support the recently-released Itanium 9300 (“Tukwila”) processor, and Microsoft’s support for these products will continue – following the Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy.  Mainstream support for Windows Server 2008 for Itanium-Based Systems (and R2) will end, in accordance with that policy, on July 9, 2013, while extended support will continue until July 10, 2018.  That’s 8 more years of support.

    Why the change?  The natural evolution of the x86 64-bit (“x64”) architecture has led to the creation of processors and servers which deliver the scalability and reliability needed for today’s “mission-critical” workloads.  Just this week, both Intel and AMD have released new high core-count processors, and servers with 8 or more x64 processors have now been announced by a full dozen server manufacturers.  Such servers contain 64 to 96 processor cores, with more on the horizon.

    Windows Server 2008 R2 was designed to support the business-critical capabilities these processors and servers make available.  It supports up to 256 logical processors (cores or hyper-threading units), so it’s ready for the ever-increasing number of cores.  It supports technologies such as Intel’s Machine Check Architecture, which allow for the detection and correction of bit-level hardware errors.  And NEC just published a new world record TPC-E benchmark for online transaction processing of 3,141.76 tpsE on a system with 8 x64 processors – a result more than 50% higher than the previous record.

    Microsoft will continue to focus on the x64 architecture, and it’s new business-critical role, while we continue to support Itanium customers for the next 8 years as this transition is completed.

     

    Windows Server Division WebLog  Windows Server 2008 R2 to Phase Out Itanium

  • Everything you need to know about DHCP as a Systems Administrator

    Posted by Netanel Ben-Shushan on February 23 2010, 1:36 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows Fundamentals, Learning.

    By: Netanel Ben-Shushan, CSA/JNCIA-SSL/MCP/MCSA/MCSE/MCTS/MCITP

    Abstract

    This article will help you to learn everything that you need to know as a systems administrator (or SysAdmin) about this protocol and what can you do with him.

     

    What's DHCP? And why it's recommended to use it?

    Imagine that you're working as a SysAdmin for a large company with 500 desktop computers; you need to set to each desktop computer IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, DNS servers, and other network settings. How could you do that?

    If you'll try to perform this task manually you're probably going to waste a lot of time on sitting on each computer 5-10 minutes, beside time, you can for example accidently enter wrong IP address to few clients, or to type the same IP address to few clients too.

    In order to solve these "problems" you can use Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (or DHCP) in your network.

    DHCP allows you manage the networks' IP addresses scopes and other TCP/IP settings like DNS, Default Gateway, etc. from central place, this central place called DHCP server. Beside the management, if there's any problem you don't need to run between your clients, you just need to connect to your server and to check the DHCP settings, as I mentioned – the DHCP works from central place, so if there's a problem, it's probably from the server, so you know where to go in case of problem and your saving time.

    The DHCP server can provide easily IP addresses to clients automatically so you don't even need to configure and set options in the client side, all you need is to setup DHCP server, configure scope options and some other TCP/IP settings in the server side and that's it. You can provide to your clients IP addresses from the selected range that you've configured and some other TCP/IP options.

    Note: DHCP in my opinion can called "The next generation of BOOTP", because the BOOTP came first before the DHCP, and today we're using BOOTP in order to deploy operating systems by booting from the network. Beside this, DHCP was developed in order to support in large networks – something that BOOTP can't provide.

     

    How DHCP works?

    Without entering to the related technical information (DORA process) the DHCP client request from the DHCP server IP address for a while, the length of time that the DHCP client can use the dynamic IP address that the DHCP server provided can be called lease, just like the name: lease means that the client "rent" an IP address for a specific time from the DHCP server, if the client want to continue using the specific IP address the client needs to re-assign the address by renew the lease, this will happen before the expiration time of the lease if the client is still in the network.

    More in depth, the DHCP service works by using the DORA (Discover, Offer, Request and Acknowledgment) process (you can trace on the whole process using a network monitor utility):

    1. DHCPDISCOVER – The client broadcast a DHCPDISCOVER packet in order to locate a DHCP server in the network, in some cases that the DHCP server isn't in the same subnet of the client, you'll need to configure in your network devices (usually routers) a DHCP Relay Agent, in order to transfer the DHCPDISCOVER packet to the DHCP server.

    2. DHCPOFFER – The DHCP server broadcast a DHCPOFFER packet to the client which includes an offer to use a unique IP address for the client.

    3. DHCPREQUEST – The client broadcast a DHCPREQUEST packet to the DHCP server with an answer, and "asks" from the server to "rent" the unique address that the server offer to her.

    4. DHCPACK – The DHCP server broadcast a DHCPACK packet to the client, in this packet the server acknowledge the request from the client to use the IP address, and provide to the client the IP address lease and other details such as DNS servers, default gateway, etc. if the server cannot provide the requested IP address or from some reasons the address is not valid the server sends DHCPNACK packet in stand of DHCPACK, more information about DHCPNACK is under the specific subject – DHCPNACK.

     

    everything_you_need_to_know_about_dhcp_1 

    Note: DHCP service uses port 67/UDP in the DHCP server, and 68/UDP at the DHCP clients.

     

    It's recommended to check that your firewall doesn't block these ports in order to able the DHCP server and clients to communicate, and also check that your network devices supports DHCP Relay Agent in case that some of your clients are in different physical subnet.

    In some cases you'll notice another DHCP messages like these:

    1. DHCPDECLINE – If the client recognizes that the IP address that the DHCP server offer to her in use, the client will generate a new request to another IP address (in the DHCPREQUEST step).

    2. DHCPRELEASE – This message is commonly in use when the client "give up" and release IP address.

    3. DHCPRENEW – This is the request packet to renew and continue "renting" the IP address lease.

    4. DHCPINFORM – The DHCPINFORM is packet that the client send to the DHCP server in order to get more details from the server, for example DHCPINFORM can be send in order to locate another DHCP servers in the network.

     

    DHCPNACK

    The DHCPNACK or Negative Acknowledgment is a packet that the server sends if the IP address is not available in stand of DHCPACK (in use on other client for example) or the address is no longer valid. In case of DHCPNACK the client must restart the lease process in order to get an IP address.

     

    DHCP Scopes, Exclude and Reservation

    DHCP Scope is a range of IP addresses that you configure in your DHCP server as range of addresses that designed for distribution to the clients.

    For example, if you set a scope with a range from 10.0.0.100-10.0.0.200, you can easily provide only from this range IP addresses to your clients.

    You can also create more than one scope, but it's recommended to check that your scopes aren't duplicating one with each other's. At the scope creation process you can add some more TCP/IP parameters such as subnet mask, IP addresses lease time, router (default gateway), DNS servers, etc. so when the clients gets the IP addresses they'll get also the other parameters from the scope.

    In some cases, you'll need to prevent the client using some addresses, for example if your scope is from 10.0.0.1 up to 10.0.0.100, and your servers using 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.10, you can exclude these IP addresses from the scope and exclude the DHCP to distribute them to the clients, in most of the DHCP servers this option called exclude.

    Reservation is a great option if you're planning to provide specific dynamic IP address from the DHCP server to unique DHCP client. If for example in the 10.0.0.1-10.0.0.100 scope you want to provide for specific client a unique address that will be always of the client, you can easily set reservation for the client using a unique identifier – the MAC address, the MAC of Media Access Control is a unique hexadecimal physical address for network adapters.

     

    DHCP & DNS

    When you're installing DHCP server you can configure the DHCP server to set DNS updates to any DNS server that support dynamic updates. More information about the combination between DHCP and DNS you can find right here.

     

    Active Directory & DHCP Servers

    In Microsoft Windows Server with Active Directory you need to authorize your server in order to work with the DHCP service.

    In the past you could install few DHCP servers – as you wish, this action occurs problems like server crashing, etc.

    In the new Windows 2000 Server/Server 2003/2008 you must authorize your server in order to start the DHCP server, if there's an authorized DHCP server in the Active Directory environment and a non-authorized server trying to start the DHCP service in order to distribute IP address, the server will failed in this task and the DHCP service in the local computer will stop.

     

    DHCP Relay Agent

    DHCP Relay Agent is any kind of host (usually a router or server) that listen to DHCP/BOOTP broadcast from clients on subnets without local DHCP servers.

    The DHCP Relay Agent forwards the packets from the clients and the DHCP server that sitting on different physical subnets to each other in order to supply 'connection' between the DHCP Server to the clients, and opposite (from the clients to the server).

    everything_you_need_to_know_about_dhcp_2

     

    In conclusion

    Using DHCP service can easily help you as a System/Network Administrator to manage you clients by assigning, tracking and re-assigning IP addresses.

     

    About the author

    Netanel Ben-Shushan is an IT Consultant & Trainer from Israel, who works mainly with Microsoft, networking and information security systems. He's the creator of www.ben-shushan.net, a personal website in Hebrew with technical guides and articles. Beside he's website, Netanel is also writing a Hebrew weblog at Microsoft Israel's blogging community.

  • Support changes coming July 2010 for Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003

    Posted by sumeethevans on September 18 2009, 6:36 PM. Posted in Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003.

    My name is Crissy House and I am the Windows Server Operations Manager here at Microsoft. I handle a lot of our customer and partner questions and wanted to provide an update on upcoming support lifecycle changes for Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003 and help clarify some misperceptions of a Service Pack 3 for Windows Server 2003. Windows 2000 Server Extended Support for Windows 2000 Server will end on July 13, 2010.

    At this time, Windows 2000 Server will no longer be publicly supported. You will be able to continue using "Self-Help Online Support"* Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 Also on July 13, 2010, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 (at a supported service pack level) will move from the Mainstream Support phase to the Extended Support phase. During the Extended Support phase: Microsoft will continue to provide security updates and paid support (Example: Premier and Essential support, per-incident telephone/web support, etc.) Customers will continue to have access to all security updates and Self-Help Online Support options (Example: Knowledge Base articles, online product information etc.) Non-security hotfixes developed during the Extended Support phase will be provided ONLY to customers who enroll in Extended Hotfix Support (EHS).

    Please note: If you'd like to enroll in EHS, customers must already have a Premier Support contract. In addition, customers must enroll in EHS within the first 90 days of the Extended Support phase. Program and per fix fees may also apply. Customers with Software Assurance can enroll in EHS at any time. Service Pack 3 for Windows Server 2003 We have received inquiries from our customers and partners on whether or not there will be a need for a Service Pack 3 for Windows Server 2003.

    Microsoft will not have a SP3 release for Windows Server 2003. To Summarize... Self-Help Online Support* will be available for Windows 2000 Server after Extended Support before it ends on July 13, 2010. Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 will begin an extended support phase on July 13, 2010 There will be no Service Pack 3 for Windows Server 2003 *Self-Help Online Support is available throughout a product's lifecycle and for a minimum of 12 months after the product reaches the end of its support. Microsoft online Knowledge Base articles, FAQs, troubleshooting tools, and other resources, are provided to help customers resolve common issues.

    Continue At Source

  • Emergency Patch.. The effect on installations?

    Posted by MBrant on October 24 2008, 1:55 AM. Posted in Windows (general), Windows XP, Windows Server 2008, Security, Windows x64, Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP Media Center, Windows Vista, Seven, Windows "7".

    Microsoft has been quick to act on informing IT pros and the general public on the security issue in nearly every NT-based Windows version out in the wild however more details are still lacking.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

    The bug concerns the Server service found in all NT-based Windows OS responsible for communication between computers in a Windows based Network allowing for remote execution of code.

    Bink first reported the issue along with a link to the rather small KB article. Since then Microsoft updated the article (several times?) to provide more information to the public. Questions are raised after seeing this additional information.

    <o:p></o:p>Why are Windows 2000 / XP / 2003 rated "Critical" and why are Vista and 2008 rated "Important"?<o:p></o:p>Why is there information available on what could happen on Windows 2000 / XP / 2003 systems but not on what could happen to Vista and 2008 systems?<o:p></o:p>Why are Windows Server 2008 Core installations effected?<o:p></o:p>Who found this critical flaw? (Internal or external reporting)<o:p></o:p>How come Windows 7 is effected? (This also confirms the bug is in the deep roots of the NT Server service and no major overhaul is taking place in concerning these types of services in Windows 7, not that a overhaul was expected.)<o:p></o:p>The updated are available to all users via Windows Update right now. All systems using the default autoupdate settings should get the patch tonight. For enterprise deployment, please refer to the deployment guide.<o:p></o:p>

    Hopefully when the systems are patched, we could get a glimpse on how this bug works and how it could be there has been a flaw in a modern and secure system for over 8 years now. More information will be posted as it comes available.

  • A Scalable Networking Pack (SNP) hotfix rollup package is available for Windows Server 2003

    Posted by bink on September 2 2008, 3:31 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

     A Scalable Networking Pack (SNP) hotfix rollup package is available for Windows Server 2003. If you are running Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 (SP2), this hotfix rollup package resolves the following issues 

    If you do not have to have SNP features in Windows Server 2003, you can install hotfix 948496 through the Windows Update Web site to disable all SNP features.
    If you enable SNP features in Windows Server 2003, you should install the SNP rollup hotfix package to avoid any potential issues.
    The following list may not be exhaustive of issues that occur when you use the SNP on Windows Server 2003. However, the list contains the most common issues that were reported to Microsoft.
    This hotfix rollup package fixes the following issues:

    942088 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/942088/) Error message when you perform a file operation on a Windows Server 2003-based computer that has IPv6 installed: "Stop 0x000000C9"
    947773 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947773/) A Windows Server 2003-based computer responds slowly to RDP connections or to SMB connections that are made from a Windows Vista-based computer
    940202 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/940202/) A Windows Server 2003-based computer may stop responding during shutdown after you install the Scalable Networking Pack
    947775 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/947775/) On a Windows Server 2003-based computer that has a TCP Chimney Offload network adapter, the TCP data stream may be corrupted when the network adapter indicates an MDL chain whose starting MDL has a nonzero offset
    945466 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/945466/) You receive a Stop error message when a computer that is using a TCP/IP Offload Engine (TOE)-enabled adapter is running under low resources in Windows Server 2003
    This hotfix rollup package also fixes the following issue that was not previously documented in a Microsoft Knowledge Base article:You may experience the following symptoms after the Receive Side Scaling (RSS) feature is enabled. By default, the RSS feature is enabled after Windows Server 2003 SP2 is installed:
    When you try to connect to a server by using a VPN connection, you receive the following error message:
    Error 800: Unable to establish connection.
    You cannot connect to the Exchange server from a computer that is running Microsoft Office Outlook.
    Network Address Translation (NAT) clients that are located behind Windows Small Business Server 2003 or behind Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server experience intermittent connection failures.
    You cannot reliably connect to the Internet by using secure network address translation (SecureNAT).
    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connections are reset. This issue occurs when one ore more of the following conditions are true:
    You use Network Address Translation (NAT).
    You use Windows Firewall.
    The host computer is configured to be an Internet connection-sharing host server .

     

    Download the 32bit 950224 package now.

    Download the x64 950224 package now.

  • Stronger Chipper Suite Update for Windows 2003

    Posted by bink on July 16 2008, 3:28 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

    This update adds support for the following Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cipher suites in the Schannel.dll module for Windows Server 2003:

    TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA AES128-SHA
    TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA AES256-SHA
    Note These cipher suites are based on the RC4 algorithm.

    OpenSSL supports several 128-bit and 256 bit AES cipher suites. OpenSSL is used in most open software products in Unix systems. For example, OpenSSL is used in Sendmail, Postfix, Firefox, and Thunderbird. Currently, the only 128-bit cipher suite that is mutually available is RC4. Additionally, there is no 256-bit cipher available.If customers set the high cipher strength option in OpenSSL for their software product, OpenSSL disables all 128-bit ciphers. In this case, Windows systems cannot negotiate by using Transport Layer Security (TLS) because there are no mutually supported cipher suites. Therefore, there is usually an interoperability issue between Microsoft Exchange Server and the Postfix server or there is an interoperability issue between Microsoft Exchange Server and the Sendmail server. The only workaround is to use a weaker cipher and a weaker cipher strength.With this update, you can support 128-bit and 256-bit cipher suites without Cryptography Next Generation (CNG). This update enables you to use a higher cipher strength. This update also fixes the interoperability issue between the Exchange server and the Sendmail server. This update also fixes the interoperability issue between the Exchange server and the Postfix server.

    Download At Source

  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Assessment Configuration Pack for Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA)

    Posted by bink on January 30 2008, 6:08 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

    The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Assessment Configuration Pack for Federal Information Security Management Act was developed in conjunction with Brabeion Software, and contains suggested system configurations that map best practices and standards to the requirements of the Federal Information Security Management Act. This configuration pack defines recommended configurations based on a number of settings-based configuration items, and assesses your system against the desired configuration. Once imported into SCCM 2007, this configuration pack and its included configuration items can be targeted to collections of systems which are then audited for compliance with the recommended configurations. When settings are detected to be out of compliance, events will be generated and sent to the Configuration Manager server where the data is available for reporting. Please note that the configuration items, settings, and values included in this configuration pack do not necessarily represent every configuration required for Federal Information Security Management Act compliance. The administrator should verify that the rules being evaluated meet the unique requirements for their specific environment. If desired, the administrator can also modify the configuration pack by adding, modifying, and deleting configuration items, settings, and values through the Desired Configuration Management user interface within the SCCM 2007 console. Feature Bullet Summary: The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Assessment Configuration Pack for Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) includes configuration items for the following:
      • Member Server • Domain Controllers

    To understand in detail what each configuration item will be evaluating please review the properties of that configuration item in the context of the server role being addressed.

    Download At Source

     

    Also:

    Microsoft Windows Server 2000 Assessment Configuration Pack for Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA)

    This configuration pack contains configuration items intended to help you establish and validate a desired configuration for your Windows 2000 servers in order to support your Federal Information Security Management Act compliance efforts.

  • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Assessment Configuration Pack for European Union Data Protection Directive (EUDPD)

    Posted by bink on January 30 2008, 5:56 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

    The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Assessment Configuration Pack for European Union Data Protection Directive was developed in conjunction with Brabeion Software, and contains suggested system configurations that map best practices and standards to the requirements of the European Union Data Protection Directive. This configuration pack defines recommended configurations based on a number of settings-based configuration items, and assesses your system against the desired configuration. Once imported into SCCM 2007, this configuration pack and its included configuration items can be targeted to collections of systems which are then audited for compliance with the recommended configurations. When settings are detected to be out of compliance, events will be generated and sent to the Configuration Manager server where the data is available for reporting. Please note that the configuration items, settings, and values included in this configuration pack do not necessarily represent every configuration required for European Union Data Protection Directive compliance. The administrator should verify that the rules being evaluated meet the unique requirements for their specific environment. If desired, the administrator can also modify the configuration pack by adding, modifying, and deleting configuration items, settings, and values through the Desired Configuration Management user interface within the SCCM 2007 console. Feature Bullet Summary: The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Assessment Configuration Pack for European Union Data Protection Directive (EUDPD) includes configuration items for the following:
      • Member Server • Domain Controllers

    To understand in detail what each configuration item will be evaluating please review the properties of that configuration item in the context of the server role being addressed.

    Download At Source

  • Microsoft Transporter Suite

    Posted by sumeethevans on January 22 2008, 9:00 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

    Transporter Suite contains a set of tools for migrations from both Lotus Domino Servers, and generic IMAP/POP sources. For Lotus Domino the suite contains a set of tools for Directory and Free/Busy interoperability between Lotus Domino 6 or 7 and Exchange Server 2007 and Windows Server 2003 Active Directory. In addition for Lotus Domino the suite contains migration tools to migrate users, groups, personal address lists, mailboxes, personal mail archives, and applications from Lotus Domino 5, 6 or 7 to Active Directory, Exchange Server 2007, and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0. For generic POP/IMAP servers the suite contains a set of tools to bulk migrate mailboxes from any generic email servers that support the POP3 or IMAP4 protocol to mailboxes in Exchange Server 2007
     
    Download At Source
     
  • Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 Administration Tools Pack

    Posted by sumeethevans on January 17 2008, 9:18 AM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

    The Administration Tools Pack allows administrators to install the Windows Server 2003 SP2 management tools onto a computer running Windows XP Professional or a Windows Server 2003 family operating system to perform remote server management functions. This is the final version of the Administration Tools Pack; you must uninstall all previous versions before installing this version. Please read Knowledge Base article 304718 for more information on the release process for this file and description of all known issues.
     
     
    Download At Source
     
  • The Lone Server

    Posted by bink on January 9 2008, 7:19 PM. Posted in Windows Server 2003.

    About The Lone ServerOnce I was almost famous. For years, my friends and I were on the front lines: we were the Windows Server 2003 servers that powered Microsoft.com, one of the hottest Web sites in the world. Then, early last summer, everything changed. Quietly, without warning, the new kids took over. Windows Server 2008. Yes, I know, the product’s not even done yet. These were Beta 3 servers, for Pete’s sake. Long way from prime time. But there they were, humming away. No problems. All of ‘em on Windows Server 2008. Except me. The last Windows Server 2003 left at Microsoft.com.

     

    Here’s a video of my life today, it is a longer version (3:14), in case you have as much time to kill as I do:

    How can this be?If you’re like me (and I know I am), you probably wonder how a product that’s eight months away from shipping can be handed the responsibility of running something as big and important as the Microsoft corporate portal. Fact is, Windows Server 2008 was lurking around MS.com since back when they still called it Longhorn. Those early bits first took live traffic back in ’05. And since then, WS08 has been everybody’s favorite kid. They called it part of the development team. Said it was a prodigy. Given all the cool little jobs. But then, suddenly, to be given the whole enchilada? All of MS.com? While still in Beta friggin’ 3? Unimaginable, but there it was. My only hope is that some hero will come along and bring me some kind of, I don’t know, redemption. Call me a dreamer. But really, what else can I do? No matter how you cut it, I’m not long for this datacenter. My Life TodayI won’t tell you what I actually do now on Microsoft.com. It’s too embarrassing. Let’s just call it a serious fall from grace. However, I do try to keep busy. In addition to blogging in my new free time, I’ve been visiting some of the Seattle area’s finer drinking establishments (link to video) and updating my Facebook and Linked In pages. I do have time on my hands, so I’d love to hear from you!


    Critical Stats:Married: NoAge: 4 yearsHome: Seattle, Washington -- Home of the Seahawks!Processor Cores: QuadMultiProcessor: 4Memory: 16 GBInternal Drives: 8Height: 4UFavorite Restaurant: Building 42 Cafeteria

    headshot headshot

  • WSS 3.0 SP1 and Office SharePoint Server 2007 SP1 released

    Posted by bink on December 14 2007, 5:10 AM. Posted in Office, Windows Server 2003.

    Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 Service Pack 1 (SP1) are now available. These service packs include a number of hot fixes across Office SharePoint Server and Windows SharePoint Services, new Stsadm commands for repartitioning databases and renaming host site collections, and updates to documentation that address performance and capacity planning concerns. For more information about what this service pack contains, read the introductory white paper, Service Pack 1 for Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007.

     

    Download and install Office SharePoint Server 2007 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

    Download and install Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 Service Pack 1

    Full Story At Source