Contents tagged with Anti Virus

  • Microsoft Security Essentials upgrade 1.0.1959.0

    Posted by bink on February 27 2010, 4:21 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    In the past 2 weeks I noticed that on Microsoft download center Microsoft Security Essentials was re-published. But when I tried to install it, it stated that it was already installed, telling me it was the same version.

    Now it is published again and now it is a new version (build) 1.0.1959.0.

    Download and run it directly and it will upgrade.

    Download details Microsoft Security Essentials

    Microsoft Security Essentials is a free* download from Microsoft that is simple to install, easy to use, and always kept up to date so you can be assured your PC is protected by the latest technology. It’s easy to tell if your PC is secure — when you’re green, you’re good. It’s that simple. Microsoft Security Essentials runs quietly and efficiently in the background so you’re free to use your Windows-based PC the way you want—without interruptions or long computer wait times. *Your PC must run genuine Windows to install Microsoft Security Essentials. Learn more about genuine.

     

    Watch videos to help you get the most from Microsoft Security Essentials.

  • Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 Beta Guide

    Posted by bink on November 4 2009, 2:02 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    Microsoft System Center Essentials 2010 provides IT professionals in mid-sized organizations, a unified physical and virtual management experience. It enables you to better secure, update, monitor, and troubleshoot from a single console, so you can efficiently and proactively manage your IT environment.

     

    System_Center_Essentials_2010_Deployment_Guide.docx 2.0

    Download details System Center Essentials 2010 Beta

    See also :Operations Guide for System Center Essentials 2010 Beta

    System Center Essentials Beta Resource Site
  • Microsoft will soon unveil free virus software

    Posted by bink on June 11 2009, 8:36 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    * Microsoft getting ready to unveil free anti-virus service

    * Software maker says will soon put beta version on website

    * Company employees testing it internally

    Microsoft Corp is getting ready to unveil a long-anticipated free anti-virus service for PCs that will compete with products sold by Symantec Corp and McAfee Inc.

    A Microsoft spokesman said on Wednesday that the world's biggest software maker is now testing an early version of the product with its own employees and that it will "soon" make a trial version available via its website.

    Microsoft has said that it will only include basic features for fighting viruses, which would likely make it comparable to the least-expensive products sold by Symantec and McAfee.

    More at Paul Thurrott's Super Site

  • End of Life Extension for Sybari Antigen 8.0

    Posted by sumeethevans on January 7 2009, 1:18 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    Here is some important news for customers using Sybari Antigen 8.0 for Exchange or Antigen 8.0 for SMTP Gateways to protect their Microsoft Exchange environment.

    Microsoft has decided to extend the end-of-life for Sybari Antigen for Exchange 8.0 and Sybari Antigen for SMTP Gateways 8.0 from December 31, 2008 to December 31, 2009. This decision was made to accommodate the antivirus needs of customers who are still running versions of Exchange prior to Exchange 2000 and who have requested additional time to upgrade in 2009.

    The terms of the Sybari Antigen for Exchange 8.0 and Sybari Antigen for SMTP Gateways 8.0 end-of-life extension are as follows:

    • No product support will be provided after December 31, 2009.
    • Customers will not be able to receive antivirus engine definition updates after December 31, 2009.
    • New customers will not be allowed to acquire or deploy Antigen for Exchange 8.0 between December 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. Only customers currently running Sybari Antigen for Exchange 8.0 or Sybari Antigen for SMTP Gateway 8.0 will be supported.
    • If an existing Sybari Antigen for Exchange 8.0 or Sybari Antigen for SMTP Gateway 8.0 customer has a contract that expires between now and December 31, 2009, Microsoft will only extend the licensing agreement for the 8.0 version until December 31, 2009.

    If you are an existing Microsoft customer, please contact your Microsoft Account Manager to extend your license .cfg files for these products. If you are not an existing Microsoft customer, please send an e-mail to fssadmin@microsoft.com to extend your license .cfg files for these products.

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  • Microsoft® Windows® Malicious Software Removal Tool (KB890830) 1.38

    Posted by bink on February 12 2008, 5:30 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    The Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool checks Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows Server 2003 computers for and helps remove infections by specific, prevalent malicious software—including Blaster, Sasser, and Mydoom. When the detection and removal process is complete, the tool displays a report describing the outcome, including which, if any, malicious software was detected and removed. The tool creates a log file named mrt.log in the %WINDIR%\debug folder.Note that x64 version of this tool will only run on Vista x64, Windows XP x64 and Windows 2003 x64 computers.This tool is not a replacement for an anti-virus product. To help protect your computer, you should use an anti-virus product.Microsoft will release an updated version of this tool on the second Tuesday of each month. New versions will be made available through this web page, Windows Update, and the Malicious Software Removal Tool Web site on Microsoft.com. To have the newest versions automatically delivered and installed as soon as they are released, set the Automatic Updates feature to Automatic. The version of this tool delivered by Windows Update runs on your computer once a month, in the background. If an infection is found, the tool will display a status report the next time you start your computer. If you would like to run this tool more than once a month, run the version that is available from this Web page or use the version on the Malicious Software Removal Tool Web site. Please review KB890830 for the list of malicious software that the current version of the tool is capable of removing as well as usage instructions. Also, please be aware that this tool reports anonymous information back to Microsoft in the event that an infection is found or an error is encountered. The above KB article contains information on how to disable this functionality and what specific information is sent to Microsoft. It is strongly recommended that you review KB891716 before you consider deploying this tool in an enterprise environment.The user must be an administrator to run this tool. This tool will not run on any version of Windows 98, Windows ME, or Windows NT 4.0. Note that this download is now a multi-lingual tool. For all supported languages, the same tool will show the correct language depending on the language of the operating system.

     Download At Source

  • Microsoft Malware Removal Starter Kit, using Windows PE

    Posted by bink on August 15 2007, 7:27 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    How to Combat Malware Using Windows PE The Malware Removal Starter Kit provides tested guidance to help IT Generalists combat malware attacks against small- and medium-sized organizations. Using the Windows Pre-installation Environment (Windows PE) in combination with free anti-malware scanning programs, the kit provides a low-cost, effective strategy that you can use to vanquish malware attacks.
    Every day, adversaries attempt to invade your networks and infect your systems with viruses, spyware and other malware. All too often, these attacks succeed, and frequently without you knowing about it. In other cases, employees can open the door to malware by visiting infected Web sites, opening e-mail attachments, or running macros that contain viruses.Once inside a computer, a malware outbreak can spread with alarming speed via company networks to compromise or destroy mission-critical data or personal information, and leave vital infrastructure open to new attacks. Some of the stealthiest malware even allows intruders to secretly conduct their nefarious business over long periods—using your computers!After you have been exposed to malware, and have not been able to restore infected computers, what should you do? Is there a way to fix the problem without completely rebuilding the computers from scratch?The Malware Removal Starter Kit, a Solution Accelerator from Microsoft, provides tested guidance to help IT Generalists combat malware attacks against small- and medium-sized organizations. Using the Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE) in combination with free anti-malware programs, the kit provides you with a low-cost, effective strategy and tool recommendations that you can use to vanquish malware attacks. To view this solution online at TechNet, click here.Send questions or feedback to us directly at SecWish@microsoft.comDownload At Source
  • Microsoft Malware Protection Center Preview

    Posted by bink on April 27 2007, 8:16 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    Microsoft may be a desktop software powerhouse, but when it comes to security tools it is still bulking up.

    The Redmond, Wash., software giant announced this week that it is setting up security response and research operations in Ireland and Japan and launched a preview of a new online Malware Protection Center. The efforts are meant to make Microsoft, a security industry newcomer, more competitive.

    "This is significant. It is part of the globalization of our research and response effort," Mark Miller, director of communications for security response at Microsoft, said on Wednesday.

    Microsoft is taking on incumbents such as Symantec, McAfee and Trend Micro, the world's top three antivirus companies, to conquer part of the multibillion dollar security market. Industry watchers say Microsoft has done an impressive job building its security organization, though the scaffolding has yet to come off.

    "Microsoft is entering a very competitive market and one that is new to them," said Andreas Marx, an antivirus software specialist at the University of Magdeburg in Germany. "It will take several more months until Microsoft's products can be directly compared with those offered by Symantec, McAfee and Trend Micro."

    Others think it will take much longer.

    "It will take some years, perhaps five, for Microsoft to be up to par," Continue At Source

  • Microsoft® Windows® Malicious Software Removal Tool (KB890830) February 2007

    Posted by bink on February 15 2007, 3:27 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    The Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool checks Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows Server 2003 computers for and helps remove infections by specific, prevalent malicious software—including Blaster, Sasser, and Mydoom. When the detection and removal process is complete, the tool displays a report describing the outcome, including which, if any, malicious software was detected and removed. The tool creates a log file named mrt.log in the %WINDIR%\debug folder.This tool is not a replacement for an anti-virus product. To help protect your computer, you should use an anti-virus product.Microsoft will release an updated version of this tool on the second Tuesday of each month. New versions will be made available through this web page, Windows Update, and the Malicious Software Removal Tool Web site on Microsoft.com. To have the newest versions automatically delivered and installed as soon as they are released, set the Automatic Updates feature to Automatic. The version of this tool delivered by Windows Update runs on your computer once a month, in the background. If an infection is found, the tool will display a status report the next time you start your computer. If you would like to run this tool more than once a month, run the version that is available from this Web page or use the version on the Malicious Software Removal Tool Web site. Please review KB890830 for the list of malicious software that the current version of the tool is capable of removing as well as usage instructions. Also, please be aware that this tool reports anonymous information back to Microsoft in the event that an infection is found or an error is encountered. The above KB article contains information on how to disable this functionality and what specific information is sent to Microsoft. It is strongly recommended that you review KB891716 before you consider deploying this tool in an enterprise environment.The user must be an administrator to run this tool. This tool will not run on any version of Windows 98, Windows ME, or Windows NT 4.0. Note that this download is now a multi-lingual tool. For all supported languages, the same tool will show the correct language depending on the language of the operating system.Download At Source
  • How Microsoft fights off 100,000 attacks per month

    Posted by bink on December 18 2006, 8:58 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    Microsoft Corp. has long encouraged its employees to "RAS" into the corporate network from home or from the road to access e-mail, shared files and applications.

    RAS, short for Remote Access Services, is an old Microsoft term for what most people now call a client VPN.

    Microsoft, of course, maintains valuable intellectual property on its internal network, including the source code to all its operating systems and applications. These are constant targets for hackers, and Microsoft tries to protect its most valuable assets with defenses in depth; they are behind firewalls and on networks segmented with IPsec. In addition, the entire network is monitored for suspicious activity, scanned for malware and so on.

    What do I mean by a constant target? Last year, Microsoft IT said it was the target of more than 100,000 intrusion attempts per month. Currently, Microsoft filters out about 9 million spam and virus e-mails a day out of 10 million received. Yes, that means that roughly 90% of incoming e-mails are spam.

    In that environment, you'd think that VPN connections might expose Microsoft to serious security risks. So how does Microsoft mitigate those risks while continuing to offer VPN access to remote employees and contractors? The answer to that is manifold.

    Two-factor authentication

    The first layer of protection for the Microsoft VPN is two-factor authentication. After an infamous incident in fall 2000, Microsoft installed a certificate-based public-key infrastructure and rolled out smart cards to all employees and contractors with remote access to the network and individuals with elevated access accounts such as domain administrators.

    Two-factor authentication requires that you have something physical. In this case, it means the smart card and a password. Continue At Source

  • Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool December 2006 (v1.23) (KB890830)

    Posted by bink on December 14 2006, 3:52 AM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    The Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool checks Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows Server 2003 computers for and helps remove infections by specific, prevalent malicious software—including Blaster, Sasser, and Mydoom. When the detection and removal process is complete, the tool displays a report describing the outcome, including which, if any, malicious software was detected and removed. The tool creates a log file named mrt.log in the %WINDIR%\debug folder.This tool is not a replacement for an anti-virus product. To help protect your computer, you should use an anti-virus product.Microsoft will release an updated version of this tool on the second Tuesday of each month. New versions will be made available through this web page, Windows Update, and the Malicious Software Removal Tool Web site on Microsoft.com. To have the newest versions automatically delivered and installed as soon as they are released, set the Automatic Updates feature to Automatic. The version of this tool delivered by Windows Update runs on your computer once a month, in the background. If an infection is found, the tool will display a status report the next time you start your computer. If you would like to run this tool more than once a month, run the version that is available from this Web page or use the version on the Malicious Software Removal Tool Web site. Please review KB890830 for the list of malicious software that the current version of the tool is capable of removing as well as usage instructions. Also, please be aware that this tool reports anonymous information back to Microsoft in the event that an infection is found or an error is encountered. The above KB article contains information on how to disable this functionality and what specific information is sent to Microsoft. It is strongly recommended that you review KB891716 before you consider deploying this tool in an enterprise environment.The user must be an administrator to run this tool. This tool will not run on any version of Windows 98, Windows ME, or Windows NT 4.0. Note that this download is now a multi-lingual tool. For all supported languages, the same tool will show the correct language depending on the language of the operating system.Download At Source
  • Microsoft: Excuses on iPod virus not credible

    Posted by bink on October 19 2006, 3:44 AM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    Security and quality assurance experts reacted negatively to Apple Computer's efforts Tuesday to blame manufacturing problems that resulted in iPod MP3 players shipping with a virus that affects Microsoft's Windows operating system.

    Security professionals, including Microsoft's own product release virus scanning chief, called Apple's efforts to deflect blame onto Microsoft misleading and said the batch of factory-infected iPods reveals a troubling lack of thoroughness in the company's manufacturing process.

    On Monday, Apple released a statement on its Web site noting that a "small number of video iPods shipped with a Windows virus," which the company identified as RavMonE.exe. The number of affected iPods is small -- less than 1 percent of all Video iPods available for purchase after Sept. 12, 2006, the company said in its statement, adding "as you might imagine, we are upset at Windows for not being more hardy against such viruses, and even more upset with ourselves for not catching it."

    That statement drew criticism from security experts, including Jonathan Poon, the man in charge of scanning Microsoft products for viruses before they ship.

    "It's not a matter of which platform the virus originated [on]. The fact that it's found on the portable player means that there's an issue with how the quality checks, specifically the content check, was done," Poon wrote in a blog entry.

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  • Windows virus worms onto some new Apple iPods

    Posted by bink on October 18 2006, 12:57 PM. Posted in Anti Virus.

    Apple Computer warned on Tuesday that some of its latest iPods have shipped with a Windows virus.

    The company said that a small number of video iPods made after Sept. 12 included the RavMonE virus. It said it has seen fewer than 25 reports of the problem, which it said does not affect other models of the media player, nor does it affect Macs.

    The Cupertino, Calif.-based company apologized on its Web site for the problem, but also used the opportunity to jab at Microsoft, its operating system rival.

    "As you might imagine, we are upset at Windows for not being more hardy against such viruses, and even more upset with ourselves for not catching it," Apple said on its site.

    Apple Vice President Greg Joswiak told CNET News.com that the virus was discovered last week and said the company has been working around the clock since then to discover the root cause of the problem. Joswiak said it was traced to a particular Windows machine in the manufacturing lines of a contract manufacturer that builds the iPods for Apple. The company declined to name the maker.

    "It's more important to say we now have processes in place to make sure this won't happen again," Joswiak said. "Very few units actually went through that particular station, fortunately."

    Continue At Source