Microsoft Makes a Splash at the Georgia Aquarium With National Essay Contest

Posted by bink on November 2 2006, 2:20 AM. Posted in Windows Games.

The Microsoft “Zoo Tycoon” franchise and the Georgia Aquarium challenge kids to discuss marine conservation.

Microsoft® Game Studios is teaming up with the Georgia Aquarium to introduce an educational initiative that will help excite and inform students about the complexity of and caring for marine life. Microsoft Corp., the Georgia Aquarium and AirTran Airways today announced a national essay contest on marine conservation and the importance of preserving aquatic life.

In conjunction with the recent launch of “Zoo Tycoon 2®: Marine Mania®,” the newest addition to the award-winning “Zoo Tycoon” franchise, and the upcoming one-year anniversary of the Georgia Aquarium, the essay competition encourages students in grades six through eight to submit a 250- to 500-word essay focusing on why conservation of marine animals and the ocean is important.

The grand prize winner receives a trip for four to Atlanta and a special behind-the-scenes tour of the Georgia Aquarium, where the winner and his or her family can observe whale sharks and African black-footed penguins in their natural habitats from exclusive views of the exhibits. They can also speak directly with staff biologists to learn more about how to take care of the marine animals. Runners-up receive copies of “Zoo Tycoon 2” and all franchise expansion packs, including “Zoo Tycoon 2: Marine Mania.” Additional contest details will be available at the Zoo Tycoon Web site at http://zootycoon.com.

“Our research has shown that students choose aquariums as their top choice for field-trip destinations. They’re the best places to both engage with marine life up close and form an understanding of the world’s oceans,” said Craig Davison, director of global games marketing in the Entertainment and Devices Division at Microsoft. “We feel privileged to help the Georgia Aquarium with its mission of connecting people with aquatic animals and teaching today’s students about important issues like marine preservation and conservation.”

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